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LCD vs CRT power consumption?

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by TAVENDER, Jul 10, 2007.

  1. TAVENDER

    TAVENDER Member

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    Would a 46" SAMSUNG LE46M86BD use more or less power than my Philips 36" Pixel plus CRT television?

    Our electricity bills seem to be quite high since weve had the philips (its on nearly all day), would the LCD save any power consumption?

    cheers :)
  2. John Henry

    John Henry Member

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    Compare how much watts they take.
  3. igauk

    igauk Member

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    If you got a 32" or 37" LCD you might save some money but as with most people who switch to LCD any energy saving is off-set by the larger screen size. The Samsung model you quote uses 260W whereas a 36" Philips CRTs use between 100 and 150W depending on the model.
  4. Kamgusta

    Kamgusta Guest

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    They are about 180W/200W both. But you can lower the Samsung power consumption by lowering the backlight energy setting (this will lower the overall brightness).
    BTW, I wouldn't put all the fault of the increased bill on the TV.
    3 incandescent lamps consume the same, and a dishwasher consumes 8x more.
  5. nwgarratt

    nwgarratt Well-Known Member

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    And hopefully make the backlight last longer. My TV came with the backlight on maximum. I now have it it on about a third of what it is.
  6. Kamgusta

    Kamgusta Guest

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    Yeah, but this won't be a great deal, lamps should last (minimum) 50000 hours before half brightness, so 50000/10/357=14 years on average
  7. newton

    newton Member

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    CRT's dont light the whole screen all the time but an LCD has its backlight on all the time.
    Why is energy saving used to sell flat screens, or was used and is still seen as a reason to buy one in common folklore.
    CRT is generally 75 watts on my meter.
    I believe LCD is 140 watts for a 32" which is therefore twice as bad, plasma 42" is 200 watts.
  8. Kamgusta

    Kamgusta Guest

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    LCDs do not have to power an electron beam that paints the screen 50 times a second, or to feed the same electron beam with 25000 Volts...
    Energy Saving talking is here because it is for real. A 36" LCD consume quite less than a 36" CRT. Yeah, if then people decide to go for a 46" LCD rather than a 36" LCD (and so the power consumption doesn't change much), this is a different story.
    Also, the gap is bigger with smaller displays, a desktop LCD consume half power than an identical sized desktop CRT.

    There are some guides floating around:
    http://www.mp3.com/features/stories/3175.html
    http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6475_7-6400401-2.html
    http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partne...ads/tv_vcr/Presentation_3_Characteristics.pdf

    According to CNET:
    (CRT 36") 554*0.34 = 188W
    (LCD 46") 708*0.29 = 205W
    Provided you won't use the "dimming" feature of LCDs.

    And then comes the "Energy Saving" option for Samsung LCDs. Half brightness cut the power consumption in half, because 90% of the power a LCD consume is due to the lamps.
  9. nwgarratt

    nwgarratt Well-Known Member

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    I hope so, but my £500 LCD Monitor only lasted 3 years before the backlight went.
  10. Kamgusta

    Kamgusta Guest

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    My 8000 hours 19" Eizo still go strongly on!

    Touching wood


    Sure, I wouldn't trust too much these 50000 hours. They are calculated by a non-stop use in a temperature-controlled environment, and provided there'll always be a constant flow of current (overcurrents kill the life of these lamps).
    To take care of my TV I'd reduce power brightness too, LCDs by default are set too bright, anyway.
  11. TAVENDER

    TAVENDER Member

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    interesting, so basically, theres not much in it.

    Another thought, will the new 'LED back-lit' LCD screens consume less power?

    May be worth waiting for?
  12. Analogue

    Analogue Guest

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    Sorry you got your maths wrong somewhere! 50000 hours is just under 6 years

    50000/24/365= 5.7 years
  13. sweevo

    sweevo Member

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    In theory this should be true. There's no imminent LED LCD TV's coming to market that I can tell though so I can't say for sure. I was thinking of hanging on , partly in the hope that power consumption would be much lower. Alas I found nothing out there on the web and a post on these very forums enquiring as to whether anyone else knew got ZERO replies.... :suicide:

    I've got one of those energy meters and hooked it up to a couple 40" LCD's that my in-laws had. Sony Bravia ran at 120W with max energy saving setting on, the Samsung ran at an even more impressive 80W at the lowest setting !!!! My current Panasonic 28" CRT uses approx 90W so I was impressed with them both.

    From all the manuals, specs etc that I've checked the most energy efficient LCD's are Sony, Samsung and possibly Sharp. The worst offenders IME are Hitachi & LG.

    I once used my meter on a 42" Plasma in Curry's and when we switched on the energy saving mode the consumption went up !!!! :lol:

    HTH
  14. Kamgusta

    Kamgusta Guest

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    That's because I thought nobody could watch the TV more than 10 hours/day (human beings need to sleep), and he should take at least 1 week/year off house, on holiday...
    LED back-lit screens consume less power when the diagonal is small (cellphones, handhelds, laptops), consume a little more with medium diagonals (desktop LCDs) and consume more power in TV with great diagonals, due to the fact LEDs are less energy-efficient than big CCFLs. This should change in the future due to technological advancements and local dimming technology (you will see that in the next Samsung LED LCD TVs).
    LED LCD TVs are expected to cannibalize traditional LCD TVs by 2010.

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