Home Entertainment & Technology Resource

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Is it okay to leave a tv on standby?

Discussion in 'TVs' started by mcmullanbrush, Jun 19, 2002.

  1. mcmullanbrush

    mcmullanbrush New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Messages:
    1,144
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Someone has kindly advised me in another section that most av kit is designed to be left on stanby. Does this also apply to televisions?
    I have a rear projection set and was advised a few years ago to switch the tv power switch off everynight.
  2. stevegreen

    stevegreen Active Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2001
    Messages:
    8,727
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +1,009
    I have left my Tosh 40" RP on standby every night and every days since i've had it...........never caused me a problem.

    Surely if its got a standby mode its there to be used, its not like the screen is being fed power or anything, just the led at the front of the set.

    I am of course prepared to be shot down on this one.
  3. lynx

    lynx Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    4,636
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Ratings:
    +319
    I think this may have the potential to turn into a long debate.My tupence worth,vcr-dvd player-reciever-digi box etc etc leave on stand by.Television,i'm inclined to leave the on/off switch made and use standby while i'm in the house.At night or if no one is in I switch off at the mains leaving the switch on the set alone.This is simply to preserve the switch contacts integrity as most seem to be pretty flimsy and it is easier and cheaper to replace a socket outlet than most on/off switches.No doubt many will disagree :)
  4. alanrob

    alanrob Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2001
    Messages:
    2,377
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings:
    +236
    Something to remember is that a TV sitting in stand by uses almost 60% of the power that the TV would use if powered on.

    Remember reading this on one of those EU thingies about saving energy.

    Why don't you just switch the thing off when your not using it?
  5. Xeonic

    Xeonic Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    A Modern Panasonic TV :
    On 135 Watts
    Standby 1.8 Watts :rolleyes:

    i.e. you'll need 30 TVs on standby to get near the power used by one lightbulb!!!

    The only worthwhile reason to turn off - and disconnect from mains as well - is to avoid power surges, but a £30 power strip should do that anyway.
  6. Squirrel God

    Squirrel God Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    Another good reason to turn off is because your TV will degauss when you turn it on. It won't do this if you turn it on from standby.

    Personally, I put the TV on standby during the day but turn it off at night when I go to bed. But my manual states that it is usually better to turn the TV off when not it use (rather than use standby).

    Of course, if we want to save the environment, then we should avoid the use of standby as much possible :rolleyes:

    As Xeonic has made clear, the vast majority of modern TVs consume hardly any power in standby.

    My mate's cousin died in a house fire when his bedroom TV caught fire. As far as I can remember, he had left it on standby and it caught fire during the night. Very sad. :( My mate now always turns everything off from the mains and unplugs them fully.

    Personally though I never turn off anything from the mains, except when I go away for a few days.
  7. Oblivion

    Oblivion Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2002
    Messages:
    524
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +2
    This is true. I used to know a fireman and he siad a lot of house fires are caused by tv / hifi which are left on stand-by. So I tend to make sure everything is off at night.

    Paul
  8. ricke

    ricke Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    I guess this puts an end to this thread !
  9. billduff

    billduff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Messages:
    275
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Ratings:
    +0
    I remember years ago in Scotland, once the last TV program of the night had been shown and the BBC was shutting down for the night (remember when they did that ??).

    An announcer would come on and remind everyone to turn the TV off before going to bed and to 'remove the plug from the wall'. I think that was before all sockets had switched though, for the very reason of fires.

    Used to be very common unfortunatly. I always turn mine off at the switch before going to bed.
  10. mcmullanbrush

    mcmullanbrush New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Messages:
    1,144
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Yes I think we should all follow "the bedtime routine"
    oh dear i may have given my age away there
  11. graham.myers

    graham.myers Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    boooiiiinngg


    said zebedee
  12. chris thomas

    chris thomas Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    Does this include vcr,s has it would **** me off setting my clock everyday ?
    not has much has wakeing up and havin to dive out the bedroom window in the middle of the night in my y fronts though because of a fire !!! :D :eek:
  13. Bogget

    Bogget Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Ratings:
    +2
    I am an Electronics Engineer, NEVER switch off at the wall, it does shorten the life of equipment buying new equipment is not very green is it. Being green isnt just saving electric it is saving the earth buy not buying new as often.
    My 42" TV uses 1W on standby and 160W when in use, nothing like the 45% the government claim? so why would they say it, the economy is poor at the moment so what are they trying to get us to do, they are trying to restart the economy by getting us to spend , so are you going to buy a new TV this year, maybe not, but if your TV dies will you then? Think about it.
    Watch for how many adverts on TV will want you to switch off you wall you will see a lot more of these adds over the next few months.
    Almost all electrical equipment has more stress on componants starting from cold than it does when starting from standby, when your last light bulb whent pop when was it, was it when you was turning it on by any chance? when your TV or almost anything electrical went wrong last was it when you came to turn it on? dont get me wrong sometimes things do go faulty when on but more often than not it is at switch on. But you will say "it is a fire risk when it is on", maybe it was years ago voltages are much lower in equipment now and fire is very very rare, ok then "what if there is a storm while im out and my mom always said unplug when a storm is about" (lol) ( i have heard this many times) if lightning has traveled 20 miles from sky to your house it will not worry about the last 2 feet.
    I am sure we have all worked somewhere where there is a light that has been there for years and years never being replaced it is usually because it is never turned off so no stress, it will go eventually but it will last a very very long time.
    I repair lots of equipment i always ask when or how did it go wrong 98% of the time they say i just turned it on!!!!

    BE GREEN leave it ON
  14. never-right

    never-right Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Ratings:
    +6
    Standby power is typically 10 to 15 watts per device (microwaves, TVs, Small transformers and cordless phones) and occasionally more. A 2005 study estimates the number of standby appliances in the EU at 3.7 billion. Although the power needed for functions like displays, indicators, and remote control functions is relatively small, the fact that the devices are continuously plugged in, and the number of such devices in the average household means that the energy usage can reach up to 22 percent of all appliance consumption, and around 10 percent of total residential consumption.
    Modern televisions use only a small fraction of the power in standby mode (typically less than 10W). A modern HD LCD television may use only 1W or less when in standby mode (compared to 80-125W during standard operation).
    The British Government's 2006 Energy Review found that standby modes on electronic devices account for 8% of all British domestic power consumption. A similar study in France in 2000 found that standby power accounted for 7% of total residential consumption


    Be green, switch it off unless its for less than an hour.


    N
  15. rpalmer83

    rpalmer83 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2009
    Messages:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    There are a lot of myths regarding leaving things in standby and saving energy. Claims that they take upto 60% of the power as in normal use and that you can save as much as £300 a year on your electric bill. Neither of these are true. All that typically runs in a tv is a low power transformer which runs the IR circuitry and switches a relay to supply power to the main components when you press the remote power button. The power this takes will be negligible.

    If you aren't going to use an appliance for weeks or months then it makes sense to switch off at the mains. Otherwise you are wasting your time switching off every night. All you will save is pennys on your electricity but are more likely to do damage to the appliance by constantly removing and reapplying power and wear and tear on the switches.

    There are things in the home that regularly go into standby that you can't control such as central heating control panels and fridges. These cycle on and off as programmed or as required. Yet you can't unplug or switch these off every night. A tv, DVD player etc is no more likely to catch fire or use more energy when not in a 'working' state than either of these 2 examples.
  16. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2002
    Messages:
    6,861
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +703
    The commonest exception is satellite receivers, many of which use almost as much power on standby as when fully on - virtually just switching off their video and audio outputs on standby.
    There has been a recent move to change this - with government pressure to do so in some countries.

    Chris Muriel, Manchester
  17. rpalmer83

    rpalmer83 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2009
    Messages:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    This is true, unfortunately they are designed this way to check regularly for firmware updates and to update channel lists. There is no reason why checks for these kind of updates can't be done during normal use though to save energy if the manufacturers developed their products better.

    The government is not helping with its green energy strategy though as its full of many blatent lies which will only serve to cause confusion and lack of faith.

    A big myth is with Mobile phone chargers. I have read stories saying leaving these plugged in wastes as much energy as when charging your mobile if you leave it plugged in simply doing nothing. This in itself is not true. The only energy wasted when a transformer is not on load is through the natural losses of the primary winding and this in itself is not a lot of current as transformers are very efficient.

    A typical PC power supply is rated as taking 450W+ today, most computers are left on continuous at the mains and all of these supply constant voltage to the mainboard when its switched off, this is what allows the computer to be turned on with a non-latching switch or woken up by certain events if you have set these. It does not mean that you are consuming the same amount of power switched on as it is in standby.

    It stands to sense if you are not going to use something for a while then unplug it!. Most human beings are capable of judging what should be left on and what shouldn't to a good degree and don't leave everything plugged in for the sake of it.

    Government telling lies to consumers will not help. The electric bill in our household amounts to less than £400 per year and a PC, laptop are never unplugged. 3 TV's are left on standby. A sky box, a freeview box, DVD recorder etc. So how the governments claim of 'you could save £100s of pounds by switching them off every night is acheivable baffles me.

    What they should be focusing on is getting people to replace incandecent lightbulbs, GU10's, Spotlights, Floodlights etc with more energy efficient lighting.

    People with modern appliances don't tend to think that their lighting system could be gobbling several dozens of times more electricity than their home entertainment system.

    I wonder how many people still have a 500W floodlight with a PIR on it that keep going on and off every 5 minutes with the wind and trees. I see many every day and these take the same power as 5 modern 32 inch CRT's!. It's ludicrous!.

    You can still get these lamps from B&Q for £9.99. It's time they were banned. These types of things are what waste energy.
  18. never-right

    never-right Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Ratings:
    +6
    I can certainly understand the Government for wanting us all to switch off at the plug instead of leaving on stand-by.

    The population of the UK is over 60 million, maybe 30 million households.

    That is maybe 60 million TVs on standby
    30 million VCRs
    30 million DVDs
    30 million Hi-Fis
    trailing sockets that have a led
    microwaves with led
    broadband router
    cordless phone

    I am sure that when the bods at the bbc add up the numbers, it could take a number of powers stations to power all those.

    N
  19. fallenangle

    fallenangle Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    404
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +24
    I lost a STB 3 years ago when I decided to take the anti-stand-by advice. I was under no illusion about the minimal financial advantage because I had actually costed the stand-by power consumption of everything in my home. The information is available in almost every electrical appliance's instruction manual so the lies the government and various 'green' pressure groups were and are spouting can easily be contradicted.

    I'd only been using a switch off completely routine on the aforementioned STB for a week when it just refused to boot on power up. £90 down the drain. I worked out later that it would have taken me 20+ years of stand-by savings to pay for that loss.

    However, I've always unplugged or switched off completely all my TV(s) when not being used and, so far, I've not knowingly reduced the life of any TV I've owned. Indeed my most switched on/off from cold TV, an old Philips 20" CRT, the first TV I bought myself, lasted just under 21 years with only one cheap repair necessary when it was 14.

    But I do think now with the price of electricity in the UK typically working out at around 20p a kW/hr there is some real financial incentive to switching off your TVs and anything else attached that doesn't matter like games consoles, STBs etc. At today's prices I reckon you will save about a £1 a year for every stand-by Watt that equipment is consuming. For me that's around £10 but bigger families can undoubtedly save more.

    Whether that's worth doing for an individual household is a decision you can make for yourselves. Of course if the switch-off completely routine really does reduce equipment longevity those 'savings', in all senses, over the expected life of any consumer electrical appliance might be lost entirely.

    What can not be denied though is that compared against power hungry devices like light bulbs these stand-by savings are mere pocket money.
  20. rafiprag

    rafiprag Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2007
    Messages:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    LYNX is quite right.The on -off switch on the set is usually flimsy and will only tolerate that many operations.
    as CRT sets become rare so will bulky switches.Having them changed will be no easy task.
    I have had my trusty 32zh46 Toshiba on standby since i got it new some three years ago.
    I have a power surge protector before the power socket so the set is protected.
    Be smart and keep it on standby.
  21. Bogget

    Bogget Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Ratings:
    +2
    I am an engineer i do this for a living , i am not relating something i have read on the internet, this is from years of knowledge thats why the government has now changed their mind about turning off AV equipment, The government now recommend you do NOT turn off your AV equipment as it costs more to turn it off as it shortens its life (hmm read my previous posting) but we all agree some items are better turned off as they (phone chargers) do use a large percentage of their running power on standby (about 40%) but as they only use 2w anyway the saving per household is minimal.
    So please if you have AV equipment DO NOT TURN IT OFF it harms the planet and will cost you a lot of money over the next few years.

    BE GREEN "USE STANDBY" help save the planet, its the only one we have......

    Bogget
  22. NethLyn

    NethLyn Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Messages:
    169
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +12
    Well, my DVD Recorder is definitely overly demanding of power, I'm a switch off at the wall person but when I want to make a recording I deliberately let it warm up on standby for a decent time before trying to use it - now that it's two years old.

    The older the equipment the less sensitive it is to my cutting all power, but everything's on a surge strip anyway, just to have a master switch for convenience. Only the DVD recorder's had any general wear and tear but not catastrophic damage, unlike a VCR its clock picks up again with the Freeview tuning within 48 hours, so it's worth doing.

    Electric bill arrived today, £48, only £7 more than last year when I was trying to save power. In other words, the fridge, being the only thing that's on 24/7, costs me £30 per quarter so powering everything else only when needed, cost £18 I'll risk the damage for those kinds of savings, definitely - even if you can only really get them with the spring to summer bill.
  23. jackobite

    jackobite Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Messages:
    160
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +7
    i can,t switch of at the mains...im scared in the dark!!!...i have a problem with switching off a set of powered speakers...i have to bend down..and fiddle about to find the proper plug..is it possible to get a plug/or set up, that i can switch off by...remote control???i seem to remember..reading about some device or other...that could be switched off remotely maybe it was lights or something...any one know if this is possible???....thanks ps.ive never left a tv in stand by ...but i was worried about...."fire" from these golden day,s of the BBC...old habits die hard...:lease::hiya::thumbsup:
  24. JoseD

    JoseD Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Messages:
    168
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    @Bogget

    Sorry but AFAIK when a TV is on stand-by most circuits are not receiving power anyway so what's the difference to when it's simply turned off at the mains ?

    Another thing is if it's the same to switch the on/off button or unplug it from the wall. It depends on the device but I think for TV's it's the same.
  25. Knyght_byte

    Knyght_byte Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2004
    Messages:
    11,035
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +671
    I work for an energy company and it makes me laugh every time someone sends in a letter of complaint that says 'I cant possibly have used £xx.xx this month of electricity, I barely used any lightbulbs because its summer and my TV is always completely switched off at night'.......Then on the other side of the page they say 'I even kept the Hot Tub use to a minimum this year and only used the patio heaters once a week on saturday'

    :rolleyes:
  26. olpers101

    olpers101 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    Messages:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4

    Thanks for the information. The energy saving really works, no matter how little we save when it is combined it becomes it becomes really big.:lesson:
  27. Bev Stayart

    Bev Stayart Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +2
    Thanks for this helpful info.

Share This Page