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Is a Chimney Breast part of a supporting structure?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by KhalJimbo, May 18, 2009.

  1. KhalJimbo

    KhalJimbo Member

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    Hi Guys

    I might have stumbled across a gold mine here and have the oppurtunity to a full home renovation on my folks house. I have planned everything so far with regards to what I am going to be doing and how I want it to look and new windows and where to brick up doors.

    But where I would want to do the floating wall there is a chimney breast, how do I know if it is a supporting structure? If it is, can it be removed and if so how much would I be looking at?
  2. bodoman

    bodoman Active Member

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    Surely if you are carrying out such an extensive renovation you have drawings of the house or can get access to them.

    I work in construction and you have me worried that you have to ask this on here instead of researching it first, nearly all the disaters in home renovation have been caused by well meaning amateurs and quite often with very serious consequences.

    Generally the chimney breast cannot be removed without taking the whole structure down from the chimney pots down to the ground, no mean feat.

    Sorry if i come across as a bit harsh, but please take professional advice before doing anything, good luck:)
  3. KhalJimbo

    KhalJimbo Member

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    Of course I'm not going to do any of that stuff myself, I'll get builders to do it all, just wondered if it was or wasnt
  4. bodoman

    bodoman Active Member

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    Phew, you had me worried, i thought you really would end up as Jim the Legend when it all came crashing down:eek:
    As a guide look at the way the ceiling joist run, which is easy to see if bedroom has floor boards, if the floor boards run parallel to the wall the chimney beast is on, it is a supporting wall.
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  5. Orson

    Orson Moderator

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    It maybe and it maybe not... :D

    But effectively it is, as it is supporting it's own structure, if nothing else. It may have a wallplate fixed to it supporting joists, or not, but if you want it removing in one room, you need to support or remove any brickwork above that room.

    I had one removed, but mine was a semi-detatched, and as such from the roof upwards was shared with the neighbour. So we had to run RSJ's (steel beams) in the loft to support the chimney from that point upwards, and remove all the brickwork below it.

    Cost wise, if you remove the lot, you save on the RSJ, but you have more labour involved in making good the roof, but I'd expect it to be in the £2000 area.
  6. KhalJimbo

    KhalJimbo Member

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    Hmmm, it is a massionette so there are people above it, wonder if it is still such a wise idea. All I want to do is have a flase wall put in its place to house the TV and center speaker.
  7. danmc_82

    danmc_82 Active Member

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    Threre is probably a chimney joining on to yours from upstairs, If you remove it then theres will colapse unless you put a steel arcross the top. Usually in a house the chimney is not a support.
  8. JUS

    JUS Active Member

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    I got a builder to remove mine on the ground floor but left it on the top two (cheaper option and I wasn't bothered about the space on the top two floors and didnt want the mess through the rest of the house). They obviously put a supporting structure in and got it checked by building standards. It looked quiet easy to do...didn't cost that much.
  9. ozthecoz

    ozthecoz Member

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    we had the downstairs part of the chimney removed from our 1961 wimpy semi detached a couple of months ago ( for exactly the same reason as you)

    from what i remember he put a concrete lintel in place as support and a steel umbrella type thing on the chimney top.

    cost was £350 mates rates and we had a couple of quotes of around £800 by other builders.

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