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Help, please, with 'catch-up' TV problem

Discussion in 'Freeview Forum' started by RoidEcosse2, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. RoidEcosse2

    RoidEcosse2 Member

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    I have a Panasonic full HD TV with built-in Freesat and Freeview. Model number is TX-L37G10B, full HD 1080p. It has an ethernet port, four HDMI sockets but no USB, so it won't take a dongle. It also has ports for Common Interface, Digital Out, SCART, and all the other usual phono connections. It's about 3 years old so I figure that it might have been produced a tad early for USB connectivity. It does not have built-in Wi-fi.

    I don't watch 'catch-up' telly very often but it would be useful to have it when I need it, for missed programmes which for whatever reason I haven't been able, or forgotten, to record.


    Based on my own research, I recently invested in a pair of TP-Link Homeplugs along with a 5-metre Belkin Cat 5e cable. I connected everything up, and that was dead simple. Paired the plugs as recommended and thought, here we go. And, indeed, I am now able to access iPlayer (but only iPlayer, and only BBC programmes to boot - no 4 OD or anything like that) on my telly, so the plugs and the connections are all working fine.

    However, there are two problems. The first is that programmes take FOREVER to download: OK, so I can go off and make a cup of tea. But the second, and more frustrating aspect, is that once I have the selected programme up and running, even at standard def, a few minutes into the show and it just freezes up; starts again; freezes again; and so on. HD is impossible. No-one can watch TV this way and not think about the most painless form of suicide.

    Now, the thing is, I can download and watch programmes effortlessly on my PC, which is a fairly powerful beast, custom-built, and relatively new, so I'm assuming the problems I've described are really nothing to do with line speed (where I live I get about 9.5 Mb/s download speed); in which case, I'm assuming that it's the software/hardware in the TV that isn't able to keep up. As I've noted above, the TV is about 3 years old, which in the days of analogue was nothing, but in these ever-changing digital times is an eternity. Interestingly, the iPlayer page as viewed on my PC monitor is way more sophisticated than the one I see on my TV, so I really am wondering if the problem lies with the TV. I'm pretty certain it must, but I don't know enough about the technology to understand why. I can't think of anything else.

    Incidentally, I take it that if I decided to buy a Humax box (eg DTR-T1000 with YouView) or similar 'smart' box in future, and use the ethernet connection on that rather than the one on the TV, the broadcast quality and availability of catch-up material would increase exponentially?

    Sincere apologies for the length of this post. If anyone has any answers, I'd be very grateful.


    Thank you.
  2. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson Well-Known Member

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    Can you connect your PC to the ethernet cable you have in your TV, turn off thr wireless connection and see if iplayer still works. Better still run thr speed test here.

    BBC iPlayer - Check your connection speed
  3. MarkE19

    MarkE19 Moderator

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    I would tend to think your problems are more likely to be with the Homeplugs connection.
    What speed Homeplugs do you have?
    Are they plugged directly into the wall or extension leads?
    If extensions are they surge protected leads?
    How old is your house wiring?
    Are the 2 homeplugs on the same ringmain?

    For reliable AV use 200mbps or faster Homeplugs are recommended and surge protected extensions are know to block the signals and so shouldn't be used with them.
    A bit more reading that may help with the use of Homeplugs - http://www.avforums.com/forums/networking-nas/731564-homeplug-faq.html

    Mark.
  4. winston2010

    winston2010 Member

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    First of all get rid of the Homeplugs. They are terrible things and cause interference to other radio users. And don't even consider 200 bps or faster ones. These are even worse and have been known to block out DAB radio and spoil FM reception.

    Powerline HomePlug Adapters - The Pros and Cons

    Use a CAT5 connection between you TV and router and hopefully all will be OK.
  5. MarkE19

    MarkE19 Moderator

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    So somebody living in rented accomodation should ignore their landlord and still drill holes in walls etc to run CAT5? Or even if it is your own home you should run wires that may look a mess just because some people have a possible issue with Homeplugs?
    I personally don't use them as I have no need to, but for some people they are the only realistic option. They may be far from ideal, but to say they should not be used is well OTT IMO. If they do cause an issue for your neighbours then try to come to an agreement, but for the majority there will be no issues with their use, so why worry?

    Mark.
  6. winston2010

    winston2010 Member

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    In general there is no need to drill holes to run CAT5. It will go under most doors round the door frame. It is smaller than coax cable and people seem to manage that without problems. In your own home it should be quite easy to run it without looking a mess. In my case it was under the floorboards.

    If they cause an issue with neighbours the only satisfactory agreement is to discontinue their use. There is no other way to stop then causing interference.

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