1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Connecting a ethernet cable to my Panasonic Plasma TXP42V10B

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs' started by Melwyn, Sep 7, 2009.

  1. Melwyn

    Melwyn Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Messages:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    I have just got a panasonic plasma TXP42V10B and I want to try the Viera Cast feature by connecting the Ethernet cable to the TV.

    I have the wireless router upstairs in my study while my plasma tv is in the sitting room. The sitting room has a spare Telephone point.

    I have connected one end of the Ethernet cable to my plasma screen.
    Where should I connect the other end of the Ethernet cable ?

    1. To the wireless router in the study
    or
    2. Directly connect it the the telephone point in the hall ?

    Mel
  2. Daniel SL

    Daniel SL Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    66
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Ratings:
    +6
    the router upstairs in the study.

    you can get creative with wiring but since you are asking thats probably not going to happen :)

    perhaps a homeplug Ethernet over AC solution could save you running cat5 to the study.

    or you could use a wireless bridge.

    have i helped? probably not. sorry about that.
  3. paulr2006

    paulr2006 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,549
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +1,574
    Or use a wireless gaming adapter which you can pick up for around £14 from Amazon. :)
  4. choddo2006

    choddo2006 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    8,526
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +610
    I'd go for Ethernet over Power (in fact, I need to do this for something in my house - timely reminder) - should be better than wifi
  5. killabyte

    killabyte Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2007
    Messages:
    408
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +4
    can u connect the V10 via a wirless connection? dont know u could
  6. charles_b

    charles_b Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    586
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +87
    Yes you can. you buy a wireless bridge, which to all intents and purposes is an ethernet wired connection to a device, but talks wirelessly to the router. I used one of these successfully for 3 years unti I discovered homeplugs, which are far more reliable than wireless.
  7. Melwyn

    Melwyn Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Messages:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Sorry being a novice I don't know anything obout the following technical jargons from the replies I have been receiving.

    What are these and how do they work

    1. Wireless Bridge
    2. Homeplugs
    3. Ethernet over power
    4. Wireless gaming adapter
    5. homeplug Ethernet over AC solution

    Will any of these work to access the Viera Cast on my panasonic Panasonic Plasma TXP42V10B TV ?
  8. rewerb

    rewerb Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,447
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Ratings:
    +661
    Connect to the wireless router.
  9. killabyte

    killabyte Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2007
    Messages:
    408
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +4
    so the V10 has built-in wifi?:confused:
  10. rewerb

    rewerb Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,447
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Ratings:
    +661
    No, he wanted to know where to connect his ethernet cable to : the router or the telephone socket.
  11. choddo2006

    choddo2006 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    8,526
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +610
    Not directly. People were suggesting trying a wireless bridge.
  12. charles_b

    charles_b Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    586
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +87
    This is a piece of Kit that looks like a Router or Wireless Access point, with an aerial, but has an Ethernet port on the back. You plug the Ethernet cable from the Bridge to your V10 ethernet socket. The Bridge then Connects Wirelessly to your Router. Belkin certainly do one (I have one), but I think it's USB Powered. Others may call them Gaming Adaptors

    Homeplugs are similar to Wireless Bridges, but utilise your Electricity wires in the house to create the connection to the Router. You need a pair of these (Solwise have these for around £40/50 a pair, but there are deals on at various places, including Amazon).
    1 plugs in next to your router and you connect an ethernet cable to it and your router. The Other plugs in next to your TV and ethernet cable plugs into it and your V10.

    The best thing about Homeplug is that is is truly Plug and Play - no need to configure anything.


    I presume you actually mean Power over Ethernet - this is a way of powering remote Network devices without an external power supply. This is not a requirement for your issue

    See Point 1

    See point 2

    YES, Either option 1 or option 2. I would recommend 2 having used both. Homeplug is a very easy to use system. There are various options, from 84Mb/s, 200Mb/S and even Gigabit. I would look at what you want to use. If you are looking to stream any High Definition Content, then go with 200 Mb/s (Sometimes called Homeplug AV).

    I truly hope this helps. I can recommend ADSL, ISDN, VoIP, Networking, Wireless, Advice....Solwise Ltd as a place to look at the different options available.

    Charles
  13. choddo2006

    choddo2006 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    8,526
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +610
    Actually "ethernet over power" is a term I used - I meant the same as homeplugs/ethernet over mains
  14. charles_b

    charles_b Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    586
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +87
    Choddo, It is very confusing, Homeplug really isn't a good name for it. They should really call it Powerline Networking.

    Incidentally, Belkin just release their Gigabit Homeplug, Several places have it at around £120 for a pair, which is not bad price for the speed. Apparently compatible with the 200Mbit kit..... I might be investing as I wanted to move my NAS into my Garage and 84Mbit doesn't really cut it against my current hard-wire connection.
  15. Melwyn

    Melwyn Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Messages:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi Charles,

    I am facinated by this Homeplug option.
    But I am a bit suspicious of using the electricity wires for ethernet connectivity.
    Is there any chance of contamination happening, like electricity current getting passed through the eternet cable connected to the TV. In this case won't it screw up the TV.
    Maybe my fears are without any justification and entirely unfounded.

    Mel
  16. choddo2006

    choddo2006 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    8,526
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +610
    My NAS is the reason I'm looking at this - and you're right, anything less than gigabit is painful but I don't need to go as far as a garage so I think maybe a long ethernet cable will be more palatable to the bank manager :) I'd be interested in your findings on performance if you do go for the pricey option.
  17. choddo2006

    choddo2006 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    8,526
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +610
    I think they probably thought of that when they designed them ;)
  18. charles_b

    charles_b Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    586
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +87
    Mel

    You shouldn't have any issue with Homeplug. I've been using it for 2-3 years with it constantly connected to my router and 3 separate PC's and not had any issue. It won't affect your TV at all.

    It utilises a signal passed through the copper wires at a separate frequency to the electricity itself. The plugs filter the signal and convert to ethernet. It's similar to how the ADSL signal works and why you have a filter in place to separate out low frequency (Telephone conversation) and high frequency (internet) for internet delivered over telephone lines.

    I'm more worried about the effect on my kids of all the wireless signals bouncing around in the radio spectrum.

    Charles
  19. charles_b

    charles_b Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    586
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +87
    Choddo, I have 100 metres of Cat5e and a £12 cable feeder from b&q, plus crimping tools etc.. bought when b&q were having a sell off of loads of networking kit about a year or 2 ago. I'm going to try that option before I resort to spending on gigabit powerline, although I think it might involve a considerable amount of sweat/swearing and bruised knuckles.
  20. charles_b

    charles_b Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    586
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +87
    Quick Update. I've got some issues with hard-wiring, so Powerline is back on the cards. I thought this link to a review of the Belkin Gigabit, including side-side comparison with the netgear XAV1004 kit (200mbps)

    http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/view/30888/51/

    One thing to note is that this is a US review, where they use 110V, they also have an issue with AFCI Circuit Breakers killing homeplug signals, but I'm pretty sure that these are an American/Canadian system for breaking circuits (Anyway, my current 85Mbps setup goes through 3 circuit breakers to my Garage and I get consistent 50-60mbps speed - according to the supplied software, not real world)

    Interesting that the Netgear outperformed it in some areas. I'm not known to be an early adopter of technology, so I might be waiting a while before relocation of my NAS
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2009

Share This Page