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12th June 2011

Discussion in 'Podcasts' started by Phil Hinton, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. Phil Hinton

    Phil Hinton Editor Staff Member

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    Home Cinema Podcast : 12th June 2011

    In this edition the team discuss 3D production techniques used to capture movies and TV shows. Plus we discuss recent reviews.

    Time: 1:02:58 Size: 71.5 mb. Direct Link
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2013
  2. batman1

    batman1 Member

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    Nice and informative on the subwoofers.

    Can you shed any light, on what the pc software is called that your contributer uses on his pc, to calibrate the peaks and troughs.

    Thanks, Dave.
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  3. TJP75

    TJP75 Member

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    A cornucopia of information to be had in this episode. Steve Withers has been an excellent addition to an already fantastic group of hosts. Keep talking about 3D for as long as you like gents, I find it an interesting subject & I'm sure others feel the same. The history of 3D was very interesting, both to read and hear about.

    Please post links to the software used to calibrate the subwoofer, this was another excellent discussion. Posting links to the various stories and products mentioned would be a great addition to the podcast landing page.

    All in all, another excellent show gents.

    Cheers.
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  4. AngelEyes

    AngelEyes Active Member

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    Great Podcast again, I especially liked the 'seamless' edit during Russell's monologue where somebody obviously decided it would be a good idea for him to expalain what the heck he was talking about :D.

    Gentlemen, the software Russell was alluding to is 'Room EQ Wizard' (can I mention that here?) which evolved from the Tag Maclaren TMREQ software and continues to be developed by genius John Mulcahy.

    The software runs on Java so is also MacOSX & Linux compatible.

    It dovetails quite nicely with a number of hardware EQ solutions as well, with filters specifically designed for Velodyne's SMS-1, Behringer Feedback Destroyers and other more esoteric hardware.

    For those following Russell's description of room modes there is great little tool included called 'Boundary and Modal Simulation' into which you can enter your room dimensions, seating and subwoofer positions and it will estimate your room modes. This allows you to 'try' different positions in order to improve the response i the listening position before dragging your sub around. Obviously actual measurement is best but it can save some time in ruling out particularly bad spots.

    Adam :)
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    Last edited: Jun 14, 2011
  5. batman1

    batman1 Member

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    Thanks for the info Angeleyes.
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  6. AJBek

    AJBek Member

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    A good podcast again guys. I was particularly glad to hear the very real issue of the 3D vision of the viewer being mentioned as this is often forgotten about when people talk about 3D cinema and TVs.

    You guys know 100% more than I could even about the technology involved in 3D TVs projection etc, but one thing I do know a lot about is the human visual system and what we call stereoscopic binocular vision.

    As you guys rightly say this varies hugely from person to person. We have equipment that can actually measure the quality of stereoscopic vision in seconds of arc and from these measurement we can tell how well the person will be able to see 3D.

    Basically 99% of those with any sort of squint, even when it has been surgically corrected, has no true 3D vision and will gain nothing from 3D technology. Not only that, many people with a large difference between their eyes can end up with a so called "lazy eye" which will again reduce 3D vision considerably.

    Even people who have an unequal prescription may struggle to achieve the full 3D effect if not wearing their normal prescription glasses, which many will no do if they have to wear 3D specs as well.

    I have never heard any of this mentioned in 3D TV reviews, and I go out of my way to tell all my customers in this position to save their money both in the cinema and when buying a TV. It is good to hear you guys discussing this on the podcast.
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